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200 Watt Savonius Type Wind Generator ebook plan

200 Watt Savonius Type Wind Generator ebook plan
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twswtp/ebook/0/0
Author
Peter Hanbury
Binding
ebook - pdf
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Publisher
OneToRemember - Jemmett Engineering
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£0.36
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Savonius wind turbines are a type of vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT), used for converting the power of the wind into torque on a rotating shaft. They were invented by the Finnish engineer Sigurd J Savonius in 1922. Savonius turbines are one of the simplest turbines. Aerodynamically, they are drag-type devices, consisting of two or three scoops. Looking down on the rotor from above, a two-scoop machine would look like an "S" shape in cross section. Because of the curvature, the scoops experience less drag when moving against the wind than when moving with the wind. The differential drag causes the Savonius turbine to spin. Because they are drag-type devices, Savonius turbines extract much less of the wind's power than other similarly-sized lift-type turbines.

Much of the swept area of a Savonius rotor is near the ground, making the overall energy extraction less effective due to lower wind speed at lower heights. Savonius turbines are used whenever cost or reliability is much more important than efficiency. For example, most anemometers are Savonius turbines, because efficiency is completely irrelevant for that application. Much larger Savonius turbines have been used to generate electric power on deep-water buoys, which need small amounts of power and get very little maintenance. Design is simplified because, unlike horizontal-axis turbines, no pointing mechanism is required to allow for shifting wind direction and the turbine is self-starting. Savonius and other vertical-axis machines are not usually connected to electric power grids. They can sometimes have long helical scoops, to give smooth torque. The most ubiquitous application of the Savonius wind turbine is the Flettner Ventilator which is commonly seen on the roofs of vans and buses and is used as a cooling device. The ventilator was developed by the German aircraft engineer Anton Flettner in the 1920s. It uses the Savonius wind turbine to drive an extractor fan. The vents are still manufactured in the UK by Flettner Ventilator Limited[1]. Small Savonius wind turbines are sometimes seen used as advertising signs where the rotation helps to draw attention to the item advertised. They sometimes feature a simple two-frame animation.

The Savonius vertical axis windmill although less efficient than a conventional design does not require to be headed into the wind . This manual gives basic details of how to construct wind generator using oil drums and a car alternator or dynamo which will give up to 200 wattsbattery charging. The plan includes details of gearing that can be used, together with regulatedand unregulated versions using dynamos and alternators.

The plan will be delivered in pdf format. The plan has a total of 28 pages and includes website links to wind associations, and other interesting websites. The plan is not available for resell.

From the plan.......

Introduction to the Savonius wind turbine

Wind units can be divided into two major types, horizontal axis and vertical axis machines.

Horizontal machines some times known as HAWT (Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines) are the

traditional conventional design, they consist of a rotor with one to twenty blades driving a

generator or a pump either directly or through a gearbox, chain or belt system. A tail vane or

fantail is required to direct the machine into the wind.

They are usually more efficient than vertical axis units known as VAWT (Vertical Axis

Wind Turbines). Savonius and Darius are two designs of vertical axis machines. This

type of unit is often not situated on a tower and does not have to be directed into the

wind. Materials and construction are usually cheaper than horizontal axis machines.

The Savonius windmill was the brainchild of Sigrid Savonius of Finland. The racing

driver of the 1930s said the secret of a good machine was to "add lightness and

simplicate". A simple unit can be made by attaching two halves of vertically split oil

barrel to a vertical axis this produces a low speed high torque unit that can be used

for pumping water and through a gearing mechanism, generating electricity. This

design also has the advantage of an aerodynamic effect called the "magnus

principal”, suction is formed by the air moving over the convex face of the rotor. This

means that there is force acting on the face of the rotor pulling it into the wind.

The most ubiquitous application of the Savonius wind turbine is the Flettner Ventilator

which is commonly seen on the roofs of vans and buses and is used as a cooling

device. The ventilator was developed by the German aircraft engineer Anton Flettner

in the 1920s. It uses the Savonius wind turbine to drive an extractor fan. The vents

are still manufactured in the UK by Flettner Ventilator Limited.

Small Savonius wind turbines are sometimes seen used as advertising signs where

the rotation helps to draw attention to the item advertised.

About these plans

This plan was developed to make use a car alternator maybe not the best generator but certainly widely available. The plan was originally written Peter Hanbury in the 1970s with the rights for reproduction bought by Richard Jemmett (then Jemmett Engineering) in the 1980s. Since then many hundreds have been sold and successfully built. The plan is in its original form and may be a little difficult to read in places.

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